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Dustin Hawkins

Obama Fights Rational Voter I.D. Laws

By March 14, 2012

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The Obama administration has once again blocked a state from passing reasonable voter identification laws, infringing on Texas' right to help ensure fair elections. The new law would simply require that a voter must show a valid identification in order to cast a ballot.

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The lack of a reasonable voting requirement measures leaves the door open for all sorts of fraud, including ballots to be cast by non-citizens, or high turnout of recently deceased voters. According to the voter application website for Texas, I can get a voter I.D. without providing any proof of residency, a drivers license, or even a social security number. There's seems to be little or nothing that would stop a group of individuals for registering many times over, casting multiple early votes, requesting absentee ballots or voting at multiple locations. It's open season for voting in Texas, in other words.

The Obama administration instead argues that such a law is "unfair" and it is unreasonable to expect that someone could be able to obtain a government-issued identification, even if it were free. Yet the government does not feel this way about showing identification for entering a federal building or nightclub, applying for a passport, applying for a job, or purchasing alcohol, tobacco, airline tickets, train tickets, guns, cars, and homes. If anything, it's almost unreasonable to assume that a US citizen would not have some form of valid photo identification.

Previously: Over the past several election cycles there have been many alleged instances of voting fraud found to have occurred during the voting process. There have been instances of votes being cast in the names of the recently deceased, allegations of double registrations, and absentee voter fraud. In many states you can simply show up to vote with any registered name and be allowed to vote, without proof. A number of states have sought to make it a requirement to show a government issued ID to vote, which has proven both logical and popular idea among voters. One such state is South Carolina, which passed legislation that would have required voters to present an official government-issued photo ID. The law doesn't seem too unreasonable given that there are laws requiring ID's for all sorts of things including driving, purchasing alcohol or tobacco, and flying on an airplane. But once again, the DOJ interfered and prevented South Carolina from enacting the law.

Comments

March 15, 2012 at 8:50 am
(1) Conservative Mark says:

Well, you got a president with a hinky birth certificate made in Photoshop using the social security number of a dead man fron Connecticut, what would you expect? The Obama administration reminds me of that old computer saying, “Garbage in – garbage out.”

March 15, 2012 at 10:17 am
(2) Realtime53 says:

Hi Dustin –

“Over the past several election cycles there have been many alleged instances of voting fraud found to have occurred during the voting process.”

The key word is ‘alleged’. Per your link to Justin’s article, yes it can happen. Has it happened? It is a tough crime to prove, let alone detect, I would agree. However, despite the best efforts of dozens of Republican federal prosecutors, there have only been a handful of voter fraud prosecutions, nation wide. Only six people are currently serving time for voter fraud.

One prosecutor was actually fired for publicly stating that she couldn’t find any voter fraud.

OTH, per Justin, “The suppression of minority voters by Republicans in 2000 was unconscionable”. That has happened, now hasn’t it? And voter id laws would make voter suppression much easier. Already, we have heard of cases of the elderly and minorities being refused a ballot. “State issued, but not not a picture ID.” “State issued, picture ID, but not dated.”

March 15, 2012 at 12:27 pm
(3) RealTime53 says:

Hi Dustin –

“There’s seems to be little or nothing that would stop a group of individuals for registering many times over, casting multiple early votes, requesting absentee ballots or voting at multiple locations.”

I could see an organization, for example the Democratic or Republican Party, doing exactly this. However, an individual? Why? What would be the advantage? A federal crime, the penalties would far outweigh any possible gain.

If an organization were to go to these lengths to cast fraudulent ballots, would they not go the extra step and just provide fake IDs?

Justin wrote of the Florida Presidential election of 2000, decided by 257 votes. With respect, there was far more evidence of voter suppression in Florida 2000, than of voter fraud.

Voter ID laws would keep far more people, who were legally entitled to vote, from voting than preventing people from casting fraudulent Ballots.

March 15, 2012 at 4:09 pm
(4) usconservatives says:

It’s hard to catch people committing voter fraud when there are no mechanisms in place to prevent or catch voter fraud. This video earlier this year shows how easy it could be: http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-TV/2012/03/13/EXCLUSIVE%20OKeefes%20Project%20Veritas%20Exposes%20Voter%20Fraud%20In%20VT%20Primary

A dedicated group of people, perhaps a “community organization” or such, could easily troll for recently deceased voters and cast multiple ballots at multiple precincts throughout the day.

The reality is we know there are all forms of voter fraud going on, including dead people casting ballots http://www.wftv.com/news/news/dead-people-voting-throughout-florida/nFCnL/.

It’s also not out of the question that in a country with tens of millions of illegal immigrants living here, that a large percentage of them may try to register and vote. Do you think no illegal aliens in Texas are registered to vote? There is no proof needed to obtain a voter id outside of “promising” to be a US citizen. Since they don’t check ID’s, you don’t even have to use a real name.

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