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Basic American Rights

By May 13, 2008

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I was going to add this as an addendum to yesterday's blog post, but after further consideration, I believe this warrants a post of its own.

I am, frankly, shocked at the level of vitriol coming from Obama's supporters these days.

Their outrage at the mere suggestion that Hillary Clinton might win the Democratic nomination has bordered on violent. I have received numerous vulgar e-mails from his supporters, with a kind of rhetoric usually reserved for hate-groups. It's scary, actually. And it makes me wonder: if they are this fired up about a candidate in their own party, what will they be like when Obama faces a challenger from across the aisle? And, even more terrifying, what happens if he loses? Would this violent rhetoric actually spill over into physical violence? Would there be riots?

Let me be clear: I am not "for" or "against" either of the Democratic candidates in their nominating process. Like many other conservatives, I am curously interested in the outcome of the race because whoever wins will face presumptive GOP nominee John McCain. It is only natural to gawk at a circus, and that's exactly what the Democratic race has become.

The fact is, Obama has not clinched the nomination, regardless of what his supporters may profess. If Obama had already locked it up, why would his supporters become so ferociously angry at the slightest suggestion that Hillary has a fighting chance? Why wouldn't they just look toward the future and let Hillary and her husband do their thing in West Virginia, Kentucky, Oregon and Montanna?

If Hillary wants to run, I say let her run. More importantly, don't take away the rights of Democrats to vote for her.

When Mitt Romney was still in the GOP race, everyone thought it was over for him when Giuliani bowed out. I was quite alone in my belief that McCain would pull it out. There were people who told me that McCain couldn't mathmatically win. Yet here we are.

As the front-runner, John McCain never -- to my knowledge -- advocated for the departure of a fellow Republican candidate and, although they are admittedly not much of a threat, still faces challenges from Ron Paul and Alan Keyes at the Republican National Convention in September. McCain seems to understand that these people have a constitutional right to be heard.

It's ironic, actually, because I am no more a Hillary Clinton supporter than I am a Barack Obama supporter. But I will defend to my dying breath their constitutional right as natural-born Americans to run for president.

Photo © Steve Bronstein/Getty Images

Comments

May 13, 2008 at 11:56 am
(1) Miles Teg says:

If you stop running pro-Hillary articles, people might stop accusing you of being pro-Hillary.

This addendum is just another pro-Hillary piece.

May 14, 2008 at 5:20 pm
(2) Robert Hamer says:

“The fact is, Obama has not clinched the nomination, regardless of what his supporters may profess.”

We can split hairs over what exactly a candidate has to do to “clinch the nomination”, but the fact remains that the math is heavily against Hillary Clinton — it’s been against her since the Potomac Primaries — and her chances of getting the nomination at this point are extremely unlikely. No one but the most ardent Clinton supporter would even argue that.

“If Obama had already locked it up, why would his supporters become so ferociously angry at the slightest suggestion that Hillary has a fighting chance?”

Because they’re supporters of a presidential candidate, and that type of behavior is expected (although with Obama is a *little* more substantial). Remember the fervor of Ron Paul supporters?

“Why wouldn’t they just look toward the future and let Hillary and her husband do their thing in West Virginia, Kentucky, Oregon and Montanna?”

I think at this point they just want it to be official so that the media and the party can focus on “Obama vs. McCain” instead of “Obama vs. Clinton (again)”. That’s perfectly understandable.

“When Mitt Romney was still in the GOP race, everyone thought it was over for him when Giuliani bowed out.”

Really? You heard others say that Mitt Romney clinched the nomination after Giuliani bowed out? Because from what I can remember, the former New York mayor dropped out only AFTER McCain beat him in Florida and pulled ahead in the delegate count. Afterwards, the former author of this site, Susan Heathfield, practically begged us to vote for Romney on February 5th, saying, “a vote for Huckabee or Paul is a vote for McCain”, but after Super Tuesday, McCain had more delegates than Romney and Huckabee and Paul combined. So when exactly was Romney declared the front-runner after Giuliani’s departure?

“As the front-runner, John McCain never — to my knowledge — advocated for the departure of a fellow…candidate…”

To my knowledge, neither has Obama. What’s your point?

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